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surfresearch.com.au 
 manufacturers : rip curl surfboards 

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A major wetsuit and surf wear manufacturer, the company

Rip Curl Surfboards
42 Bell Street Torquay Vic. ph 92 3774
5 Boston Road, Torquay Victoria Phone 612 252.
101 Geelong Road, Torquay Vic (052) 61 2904 
1967
Bells Beach Surfshop, Torquay.
Retailing surfboards from several Brookvale manufacturers including Keyo, Wallace and Shane.
Late 1968
First factory in Brian Singer's garage, Torquay

1969

Brian Singer, Doug Warbrick, 
Andy Spangler, Wayne Lynch;  B. Davis
Note impact on local surf industry of the 1970 World Contest at Bells Beach-Johanna
1971 
Richard Evans.
1974
Jim Pollock, Alan Colk, Kingsley "Knackers" Kanouski (KKK), originally from California
1976
Wayne Lynch, Don Alcroft, 'Sparrow', Pat Morgan and Dennis Day ;
1977
Wayne Lynch, Pat Morgan and Rany Rarrick (USA)
1979
Wayne Lynch and Warren Powell
1985
Maurice Cole, Michael Anthony, Ross Slaven.
1986
Rodgers - High Voltage
1988
Wave Jumper (sailboard) shaped by Wayne Lynch

Top right : Bell's Beach Surf Shop Rip Curl Model, circa 1968.
Peter Turner Collection. Photo: Andrew Sheild  ASL, June 1999. Issue 129 page 43.

Bottom: Rip Curl Research, Blue, circa 1970. Contributed, with thanks, by Jonno, April, 2013. 




Rip Curl Model, 1970.

Rip Curl, Boston Road,1976.
 


Rip Curl Boston Road, 1974.


Rip Curl: Darrell Dell, 1974.
Rip Curl, Richard Evans, 1976.

Rip Curl: Darrell Dell, 1974.
Decal thanks to Snazzy, June 2019.

Rip Curl, Boston Road, phone 252. 
# 45 Farrelly script '69
Rip Curl, Boston Road  #230


Rip Curl and Rip Curl Surfboards, 1975.
Numerous decals thanks to Snazzy, January 2019.


Semi-circle graphic, circa 1975.

Semi-circle graphic, circa 1974.

KKK Designs from Rip Curl, circa 1974 (Kingsley "Knackers" Kanousk)



RIPCURL
 
and
Designed and Shaped by Don Allcroft, circa 1978.



Rip Curl Surfboards
Wayne Lynch Design, circa 1976.

Shaped by Wayne Lynch
Rip Curl Surfboards,
circa 1978.



 
Shaped by Wayne Lynch for
Rip Curl, Torquay, circa 1978.

Image contributed, with thanks, by  Michael Rundell.April 2006.


Rip Curl: Rodgers Shape, 1978.
Rip Curl Blocked Decal circa 1980.
Decal image contributed with thanks by Snazzy,  December 2010.


 
1985



1986
 
1988

1992




Doug Rodgers High Voltage, 1986


1987

1988

1999



Rip Curl: Advertising

Wind Surf
October 1985




Surfing World
Volume 15 Number 5
December 1971


Tracks June 1973, Bitza page ?.

Extract from Jarratt, Phil: Salts and Suits - How a bunch of surf bums created a multi-billion dollar industry ... and almost lost it.
Hardie Grant Books
85 High Street Prahan, Victoria, 3181, Australia, 2010.

Page 92
Meanwhile, in Australia, the summer of 1967-68 proved to be the biggest in the twelve-year history of the modern surfboard.
Within weeks of the prototype Plastic Machines rolling out at the Keyo factory in Brookvale, most of the big Sydney manufacturers had their own version in production.

Doug Warbrick, who had enjoyed a box seat for the birth of the shortboard revolution, prevailed upon Keyo owner Denny Keogh to give Bells Beach Surf Shop the ...

Page 93
... Victorian agency so that they could take advantage of the summer boom.
'Claw' Warbrick managed to secure Plastic Machine #4 for his protege Wayne Lynch, commonly regarded as the most exciting young surfer in Australia, and a board numbered in the twenties for himself, but there was already a long waiting list and he had to return to Victoria and wait for delivery.
Warbrick recalls: 'When our boards finally arrived everyone was blown away.

Within two days we had a hundred orders for them but Keyo couldn't supply for months.
It was a ridiculous situation.
My partners, Brian Singer and Terry Wall, and I had a discussion and decided we'd have to go to the knock-off blokes.
Brian drove to Sydney the next day to cut a deal.'

Singer, who when he wasn't running a surf shop was teaching at Lorne High (or more likely missing class to surf with his star pupil, Wayne Lynch), contracted veteran shaper Bill Wallace to produce a version of the Plastic Machine, but Wallace was also suffering from a backlog of summer orders, and ultimately Singer was forced to go to the relatively untried Shane Surfboards.
Shane Stedman had started out a couple of years earlier in landlocked Eastwood, building decidedly uncool surfboards for the mass market.
But the affable Stedman was a competent craftsman and a great marketer, and when he finally made the move to 'surfboards central' at Brookvale, he went after the market, signing big names, playing the psychedelic game and creating a big enough production facility to take on the surfboard establishment.
Singer shook hands with him on a deal to supply boards for the Victorian market.
In Noosa in the winter of 1967, Claw Warbrick had been fascinated by one of the Hayden boards that McTavish had built as he edged closer to defining his new concept.
The board was certainly shorter and wider than most, but it was still a standard longboard, a fact that McTavish had attempted to disguise by getting a local artist to design a logo in the drug-haze style of Sydney artist Martin Sharp's Disraeli Gears album cover for the super-group Cream.
(If the shape wasn't quite there, at least the graphics would be!)
Under the logo, McTavish had placed the words 'Hot Kid Rip Board', a kind of ...

Page 94

... obscure shorthand combination of words that might be seen as the free-flowing verbiage of someone tripping on LSD... or so McTavish hoped.
In fact, the slogan went nowhere, but Warbrick remembered it, and when he took delivery of his own personal Plastic Machine, he had Torquay artist Simon Buttonshaw paint a flower power emblem on the deck.
All hippie art needed words, so Warbrick and Buttonshaw brainstormed and came up with a slogan in homage to the McTavish original- 'Rip Curl Hot Dog'.

When Brian Singer returned to Torquay with the news of his contract surfboard deal with Shane, the partners had to hurriedly decide on a graphic logo and a slogan that could be sent to the Brookvale decal guru, Jim the Printer, before the first boards were glassed.
Simon Buttonshaw came up with a mushroom cloud logo that all agreed looked great, but, recalls Warbrick: 'The original words from my board didn't fit, and we kind of felt they were too American anyway.
So we dispensed with the 'hot dog' part, and that left us with 'rip curl'.
None of us thought it was that brilliant, but you've got to remember, there was a lot of shit going around at the time, so it wasn't that bad either.'

Rip Curl Surfboards were manufactured under licence by Shane Surfboards until late 1968, when the Torquay partners went into production for themselves, using Singer's garage as their first factory.





Jarratt, Phil : 

Salts and Suits
- How a bunch of surf bums created a multi-billion dollar industry ... and almost lost it.

Hardie Grant Books
 85 High Street Prahan, Victoria, 3181, Australia, 2010.

This copy provided courtesy of Paul Flack.


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home catalogue history references appendix

Geoff Cater (2010-2019) : Catalogue : Manufacturer - Rip Curl Surfboards.
http://www.surfresearch.com.au/mRip_Curl.html