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the catalogue #193 
1960      Paipo/Belly Board          3 ft 5"
#204
MANUFACTURE
MANUFACTURER: Farfor
SHAPER:  Jamie Farfor
DESIGN: Paipo
DESIGNER: John Waidelich and Jim Growney
SPECIFICATIONS
CONSTRUCTION
Plywood  with fabric laminated bottom.  Branded decal. Varnished.
DIMENSIONS
Length:
3
feet
 5
inches    
Width:
 29 1/2
inches
 
Wide Point from Tail:
+7
inches
Nose :
 22 1/2
inches
 
Tail:'
 N/a
inches
Thickness:
 3/8
inches
 
Pod:
 0
inches
Weight/
 
inches
 
Volume:
 
inches
Nose/L:
3 1/2
inches
 
Tail/L:
 
inches
Other:
           

FEATURES
Nose: round with (steamed?) noselift/scoop
Tail:  Wide rounded 
Deck:
Bottom: distinct nose lift - flat in tail
Rails: rounded square 
Rocker:  nose lift
 
FINS:
None

DECOR
DECALS:
Deck: 
" Paipo by Farfor PO Box Portsea Vic " - branded at sweet spot
Bottom:
MARKINGS
Deck:
" Paipo by Farfor PO Box Portsea Vic " - branded at sweet spot
Bottom:
COLOUR
Deck: clear/natural
Bottom: Blue/black floral tapa cloth laminate (with resin?)
NOTES
BOARD HISTORY
Dimensions and photographs Sydney Surf Auction, Mona Vale  Hotel, Sydney, 25 - 26 September 2003 
Catalogue No. 82 : " PAIPO BOARD 1960's All time rarity, plywood: great condition."
Notes by Mick Mock PO Box 330 Manly NSW Australia 2095.
Thanks to Mick Mock.

Design History
Bob Green emailed in August 2013, with thanks:
"Paipo as used in Hawaii  probably only developed wide tails in the early 1960s courtesy of John Waidelich and Jim Growney.
Known as the Paipo Nui, Valentine commercialized, rather than developed these boards."


COMMENTS:
emailed by Jamie Farfor 16 February 2005, with thanks...
I was browsing, and came across one of the paipo boards that I designed and built long ago. 
I notice that you are a little short on detail, so I thought I would fill in some of the missing bits.

I watched Val Valentine as he made a Paipo for me in Hawaii, and could see that there would be a better way of doing it. 
He used a moulding surface to shape the bottom of the board. 
This was formed in earth outside his house, and lined with cement mortar. 
He laid vaneers of timber in this with glue between, then pressed the whole thing with sandbags on top.    When the glue had set, he trimmed and finished the board.

Concave tails to boards were all the rage that season, and Val was spending much of his time trying to build a concave Paipo that would work. 
I could see that this was not working out at all, and returned to Australia with one of his regular (non concave) Paipo boards.

Back in Australia, I built a press that had a concrete base mould at table height, and was loaded with a hydraulic powered airbag. 
This makeshift thing ran off mains water pressure and put over 20 ton pressure on the boards while the glue set.
Looking back on it, I was lucky that the thing never exploded.

I started using timber vaneer, but was unable to get suitable quality of material. 
I then tried using layers of eighth inch thick hoop pine plywood, and found that with the extreme pressure that I could form the two way curve (shallow dome) at the nose of the board. 
By putting plastic sheet between, I was able to form 3 boards in the press at a time.

With the stresses in the plywood, the curvature at the nose was less than with the timber vaneer. 
By chance, this turned out to be just right. 
The boards were a lot faster than those made by Val, but the nose never went under on takeoff. 
Because the shape of the board is set by the concrete base mould, trying out new shapes is a lot more difficult than when shaping from a foam blank; so I counted myself lucky to have done so well.

I was never an obsessed body boarder, and used all types of boards. 
Even so, the finless flat bottomed Paipo is still my favorite. 
You can get out through the wildest surf by swimming with the board under waves (the Paipo only just floats), and once you lever yourself onto a huge wave, the rigid flat finless bottom will give unbelievable speed. 
Turns are made by moving to one side and tilting the board onto that side rail.        Turning is an art, and if you lose your grip on the water, you will spin out.

If you have any queries, I would like to hear.

Best regards,
Jamie Farfor 
REFERENCES
Other Boards 
See Paipo # 113 ,
Surfworld Museum, Torquay Victoria. : Lamaroo # 26
See Paipo Catalogue
Books
Margan and Finney  Photographs, pages 152 - 156
CONDITION: 9.5


bottom


Before bodyboards there was plywood.:
Sean Ross, Pipeline, Hawaii.
Board by Paul Lindbergh's Hawaii Paipo Designs.
Photo: Alan (Bud) McCray.
Sean was a life guard at the Ehukai Beach (Pipeline) during the1970's.
Photo courtesy 
Rod Rodgers, Baltimore, Maryland : My Paipo Boards and ...More.

David Swanson and his and Val Valentine's
Paipo Collection, Haleiwa, 2000.
Photo and article by David Pu'u
The Surfer's Journal,
Vol 9 No 3, 2000 Pages 122-123
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home catalogue history references appendix

Geoff Cater (1999-2013)  : Catalogue : Paipo #193
http://www.surfresearch.com.au/00000193